Bandwidth Control Policy Example


Bandwidth Control Policy Example

Bandwidth Control policies specify how an organization's bandwidth is allocated. To learn more, see About Bandwidth Control

For instructions on how to configure Bandwidth Control policy rules, see Configuring the Bandwidth Control Policy 

To see how this policy fits into the overall order of policy enforcement, see How does the Zscaler service enforce policies?

Sample Policy for Bandwidth Management

Following is a sample policy for an organization that has a 100Mbps bandwidth pipe.

Screenshot of sample Zscaler Bandwidth Control policy

In this policy,

  • The Productivity bandwidth class is a custom bandwidth class that includes business-critical apps, such as Salesforce, Office 365 apps, NetSuite, and Box. It is always guaranteed 30% of the bandwidth and can use up to 100%.  
  • The Business & Economy bandwidth class is always guaranteed 20% of the bandwidth and can use up to 100%. The Business & Economy bandwidth class is a custom bandwidth class that includes the Business & Economy category and other domains related to the business.
  • The Large Files bandwidth class is always guaranteed a minimum of 10% of the bandwidth and can use up to 100%.
  • The default rule, which includes all other internet traffic, is not guaranteed any bandwidth, but it can consume up to 100% of the bandwidth, when available. You cannot change the priority of the default rule. The service always applies this rule last. However, you can edit its minimum and maximum bandwidth limits.

When bandwidth contention occurs, the service always guarantees the specified minimum bandwidth. Therefore, in this example, the Productivity class is guaranteed 30% (30 Mbps), the Business & Economy class is guaranteed 20% (20 Mbps), and the Large Files class is guaranteed 10% (10 Mbps). The service allocates the remaining 40% of the bandwidth (40 Mbps) based on traffic from other application classes during each one-second interval. When an application class uses less than its minimum bandwidth, then the service allocates the idle bandwidth to the other classes, based on the prioritized rules.

The following scenarios illustrate how the service allocates bandwidth as bandwidth requirements change:

Scenario 1:  It's 9 a.m. and all the employees are in the office. The apps in the Productivity bandwidth class need all the available bandwidth. The Productivity class is guaranteed 30 Mbps. If there is no contention from other application classes, then the Productivity class can utilize 100 Mbps, because it is the first rule and its maximum percentage value is 100%. But if apps in the Business & Economy class need bandwidth, then the service will allocate at least 20 Mbps to this class and will allocate the remaining bandwidth to the Productivity class when needed.

Scenario 2:  It's 11 a.m. and the bandwidth requirements change. The Productivity class needs 40%, the Business & Economy class needs 30%, and the Large Files class only needs 10%. The service allocates the remaining 20% of the bandwidth to the default class.

Scenario 3:   It's 12:30 pm and most employees are out to lunch. Bandwidth usage changes yet again. The Productivity class, Business & Economy class, and Large Files only need 10%. The service then allocates the remaining bandwidth, which is 90%, to the default bandwidth class.